Simplicity 1872 – Adjusting the pattern size.

Simplicity 1872

Simplicity 1872

I picked this pattern to start with for several reasons;

  1. Simplicity – There are no zips or complicated closures.
  2. Since I’ve tried this pattern before, I already know there were sizing issues last time so I wanted to use this to try out grading a pattern myself.
  3. I have just the perfect fabric for it 🙂 I think…

Even though this pattern is quite simple, I feel that it has a lot of potential for a variety of gorgeous dress. For instance, this is what I think of when I see it.

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Source: Pinterest

And some short variations.

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I started cutting the pattern pieces out a few days ago, but I had to walk away from it because I could not decide on simple things like the length I wanted, sleeves or no sleeves..even the fabric! I have a stash of African Wax print fabrics I got from Vlisco and because it wasn’t so cheap and its so pretty, Im reluctant to just cut into it before I’m actually sure. I’d kick myself in the butt if I wasted any of it out of impatience.

Vlisco

African print

The smallest size on this pattern is a standard size 6 but I’m quite small so I had to take it in a bit. So from what I understand, the idea is pretty simple, cut a pattern apart, move the pieces away from each other to get a bigger pattern or overlap to get a smaller pattern. That’s basically what pattern grading is all about. I’m no pro yet so I’m doing very minimal changes and hopefully it all works out. This pattern should be forgiving enough though.

Preparing to trace

Preparing to trace

To get a nice clean trace, use a smooth flat surface to lay your pieces on, I just used a piece of cardboard that was lying around. Use a cold iron to gently smooth out creases on your pattern.

Burda carries these large sheets of tracing paper that I find very convinient.

Burda carries these large sheets of tracing paper that I find very convenient.

I’ve also learned that you get better results using weights to hold down the pattern pieces while you trace, rather than pinning.

You can always use water you have on hand as weights.

You can always use whatever you have on hand as weights.

cutting lines drawn

Draw your grading lines, you’ll be cutting along those to adjust the pattern.

Cut carefully and spread the pieces to increase the size or overlap to reduce it.

Cut carefully and spread the pieces to increase the size or overlap to reduce it.

Overlap and tape

Overlap and tape

Retrace and voila!

Retrace and voila!

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